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Chains and Sprockets

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Woodysrods Brian Woods
Westbank B.C., Canada   CAN
Chains Sprocket questions????
I have a real Comet TAV that lists a 10 tooth 40/41 drive sprocket.
I also have on of VKC's 54 Tooth sprockets attached to my dif.
Now I have looked at 40 Chain and 41 Chain and they are definitely different!
And after reading the story from the "Doing it Wrong" guys about the chain slop and the difference it made when they switched to at thicker 44 tooth sprocket at Tieton, it got me to thinking.
Can anyone enlighten me here?
Woody

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CmdBentaxle Avatar
CmdBentaxle Silver Member Dave D
Federal Way, Washington, USA   USA
1950 CycleKart Italian "1950 Ferrari 166 F2"
I have a 40/41 10 and 60. I use 40 chain and it has been faultless. A little side to side play and
about half an inch slack. To tight and the whole thing will wreck itself, of course.

Woodysrods Brian Woods
Westbank B.C., Canada   CAN
Hi Dave
Where did you get your sprocket?
Can you mic it for me?
Thanks
Brian

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CmdBentaxle Avatar
CmdBentaxle Silver Member Dave D
Federal Way, Washington, USA   USA
1950 CycleKart Italian "1950 Ferrari 166 F2"
Gopowersports.com 60 T live axle sprocket.
I'll try to mic it but it's tight in there with the chain on.

carChips Avatar
carChips Victor Harnish
Kelowna, BC, Canada   CAN
1933 MG Magnette
1973 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "Chip"
1989 GMC Sierra 1500 "Bush Truck"
40 and 41 chains are the same pitch, the 40 is thicker. You'll get less chain movement side to side with the 40.

Woodysrods Brian Woods
Westbank B.C., Canada   CAN
Okay, after checking around with others here on the Forum and going back to Princess Auto (Canadian version of Harbour Freight)
This is what I have come up with: # 41 chain is smaller than # 40 chain, and fits the VKC sprocket (that is made to fit Peerless Dif) way better!
And has less side play on the Comet TAV with 10 tooth 40/41 sprocket.
I am way Happier now!smiling bouncing smiley
Good Roads
Woody

Neto Ernest B
Berlin, Ohio, USA   USA
In reply to # 26121 by carChips 40 and 41 chains are the same pitch, the 40 is thicker. You'll get less chain movement side to side with the 40.

I was thinking that I had read here someplace that one of the 40 series chains (41?) has a wider link, and that it allows for more leeway if the sprockets are not perfectly lined up, or if there is some flex that throws the sprockets out of alignment momentarily from time to time. (I don't have any experience with this at all, just repeating what I read someplace since I got interested in this hobby.)

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Brian,

I did a quick Google of #40 vs #41 and found this table which will help answer the question. I understood, as said here, #40 is a bit heaver duty and a bit wider for the flex that we might see. #40 is available at any NAPA store in a box 10' long at a reasonable price.




data of ANSI standard B29-1 (Precision Power Transmission Roller Chains, Attachments, and Sprockets).
ANSI B29-1 roller chain standard sizes
Size Pitch Roller diameter Tensile strength Working load
25 0.250 in (6.35 mm) 0.130 in (3.30 mm) 781 lb (354 kg) 140 lb (64 kg)
35 0.375 in (9.52 mm) 0.200 in (5.08 mm) 1,758 lb (797 kg) 480 lb (220 kg)
41 0.500 in (12.70 mm) 0.306 in (7.77 mm) 1,500 lb (680 kg) 500 lb (230 kg)
40 0.500 in (12.70 mm) 0.312 in (7.92 mm) 3,125 lb (1,417 kg) 810 lb (370 kg)
50 0.625 in (15.88 mm) 0.400 in (10.16 mm) 4,880 lb (2,210 kg) 1,430 lb (650 kg)
60 0.750 in (19.05 mm) 0.469 in (11.91 mm) 7,030 lb (3,190 kg) 1,980 lb (900 kg)
80 1.000 in (25.40 mm) 0.625 in (15.88 mm) 12,500 lb (5,700 kg) 3,300 lb (1,500 kg)
100 1.250 in (31.75 mm) 0.750 in (19.05 mm) 19,531 lb (8,859 kg) 5,072 lb (2,301 kg)
120 1.500 in (38.10 mm) 0.875 in (22.23 mm) 28,100 lb (12,700 kg) 6,800 lb (3,100 kg)
140 1.750 in (44.45 mm) 1.000 in (25.40 mm) 38,280 lb (17,360 kg) 9,040 lb (4,100 kg)
160 2.000 in (50.80 mm) 1.125 in (28.58 mm) 50,000 lb (23,000 kg) 11,900 lb (5,400 kg)
180 2.250 in (57.15 mm) 1.460 in (37.08 mm) 63,300 lb (28,700 kg) 13,700 lb (6,200 kg)
200 2.500 in (63.50 mm) 1.562 in (39.67 mm) 78,000 lb (35,000 kg) 16,000 lb (7,300 kg)
240 3.000 in (76.20 mm) 1.875 in (47.63 mm) 112,500 lb (51,000 kg) 22,250 lb (10,090 kg)

TX
Mr fixit
Chris smiling smiley

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