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Started CycleKart #3 with suspension

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LowellR Silver Member Lowell Roemke
Tempe, Arizona, USA   USA
Wishing I had a tube bender. But we have to make do with what we can. I'm not totally happy with this configuration yet but It's something I'm considering for supporting the engine cover. It will be attached to frame but have a way to drop out rear engine sub frame if necessary.


Edit: Thought it might be helpful if I added a picture of my inspiration car. a version of an "F" series MG.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-11-14 04:37 PM by LowellR.

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LowellR Silver Member Lowell Roemke
Tempe, Arizona, USA   USA
I borrowed an English wheel from fellow AZ Cyclekart Builder, Steve Vinson and have been trying to learn how to make the shape I want for the back engine cover. So far, I have rolled a lot of Aluminum and haven't figured it out. I have been watching a lot of You Tube "how to" videos. I would like to get a rounded rear end but the compound curves elude me.

We have the Fiesta Bowl Parade coming up at the end of December and I decided to make a quick, more rectangular, engine cover for the parade. It will be a temporary engine cover while I continue towork the English wheel. Here is my progress on temporary engine cover.

First is poor man's sheet roller, then first fit, and after some mods. It is attached with clamps in the pictures. I have to wire up an engine cut off switch before going further.


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Neto Ernest B
Berlin, Ohio, USA   USA
I would jump at the chance to play a bit on an English Wheel, but of course there is the cost of the aluminum sheet. Maybe learn on steel, then switch to aluminum for the final product?

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carChips Victor Harnish
Kelowna, BC, Canada   CAN
1933 MG Magnette
1973 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "Chip"
1989 GMC Sierra 1500 "Bush Truck"
You need a stump with a hole in the center to get your curve started before you go to the English wheel. Make two strips for each curve down the tail lets say two inches in and 2 inches down the sides. Where's Tony? He knows all about that stuff.

carChips Avatar
carChips Victor Harnish
Kelowna, BC, Canada   CAN
1933 MG Magnette
1973 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "Chip"
1989 GMC Sierra 1500 "Bush Truck"

fatfendertruck Tony Sanchez
Show Low, Arizona, USA   USA
Victor that would be a good starting point. Step one would be to learn how to shrink the metal.
A shot bag and a large wood mallet is a good start for shrinking.

LowellR Silver Member Lowell Roemke
Tempe, Arizona, USA   USA
Ha, Ha, I got the shot bag and mallet. My problem isn't lack of tools. It's lack of skill smiling smiley

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carChips Avatar
carChips Victor Harnish
Kelowna, BC, Canada   CAN
1933 MG Magnette
1973 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "Chip"
1989 GMC Sierra 1500 "Bush Truck"
Bang away at a small piece of scrap until you feel it move, then it will all come to you.

Woodysrods Brian Woods
Westbank B.C., Canada   CAN
Going out to the shop to work on my Tail section right now!
Have an Idea and will be using my 20 Ton press and a buck??/??
Will let you know how that works out.
Brian

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classical-gas Scot Laughlin
Bellingham, washington, USA   USA
I prefer rawhide mallets for shrinking on thin gauge/large radius, but serious shrinking, like for cycle type fenders and tailpiece corners, a mechanical shrinker is a huge help . Harbor Fright has a useful one(comes in a kit with a stretcher) for about $80, and other $100 will buy you a stand with a foot pedal.

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