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Spoke Tightening/Wheel Truing

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Bow Avatar
Bow Reverend Bow
Yuma, AZ, USA   USA
1929 Morgan 3 Wheeler "BME RIP Special"
So i was checking some things on my cart the other day and notice my right rear wheel was loose.. Then I notice the wheel wasn't loose on the axle, the rim was loose from the Hub.. I found about 10 loose spokes.

I guess those NASCAR style tracks are stressing the right rear a bit more than the rest..

Anyone else noticed this?

I suppose it is time to learn how to true a wheel and tighten spokes...



Bow

Cut it with and Axe, Beat it to Fit, Paint it to Match



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-10-25 04:13 PM by Bow.

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Denny Graham Gold Member Dennis Graham
Sandwich, IL, USA   USA
1950 Chevrolet 3600 "Old Blue"
1954 Chevrolet 3600
Not an expert wheel assembler here Bow, but I have read up in preparation
for the day my wheels hit the ground.
The first thing I bought, and made some minor modifications to improve it,
was a wheel balancer/truing stand. And then a set of spoke nipple wrenches,
which are just fine for initial assembly, but.....the final adjustment for the first
go round and for futures "regular preventive maintenance," I'll be adding a
spoke torque wrench to the tool box.
Spoked wheels only work when the proper tension is on each wire and that
will typically be around 100 lbs tension.
You might be interested in this video:

He's also posted a good one if you ever need to re-string your wheel.
Denny Graham
Sandwich, IL

CmdBentaxle Avatar
CmdBentaxle Dave D
Federal Way, WA, USA   USA
1950 CycleKart Italian "1950 Ferrari 166 F2"
Oh, yeah.
The SlymeDawg oval has been hell on right rear wheels.
We've taken to checking spokes almost constantly.

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MichaelR Avatar
MichaelR Michael Richard
Albany, GA., USA   USA
There's another spoke tuning trick. I forget the name, but there is an app for smartphones that will give you the frequency of a musical note. You tap the spokes one at a time in the same place and adjust your way around till they all hit the same freq. It's really pretty accurate. You could probably do the same thing with an electronic guitar tuner, but not sure.

SteveV Avatar
SteveV Steve Vinson
Phoenix, AZ, USA   USA
1924 Ford Model T "Viscount Vinson Special"
1927 CycleKart American "Mono Wasp"


Here is a little video I made about truing the wheels on our karts.

Cheers
Steve



Steve Vinson
Arizona CycleKart Club

Design-Build-Race-Repeat

Bow Avatar
Bow Reverend Bow
Yuma, AZ, USA   USA
1929 Morgan 3 Wheeler "BME RIP Special"
Thanks for the videos gents.

I actually used this one:


But I will check yours out Steve



Bow

Cut it with and Axe, Beat it to Fit, Paint it to Match

andrewroudny Avatar
andrewroudny andrew roudny
peterborough, ON, Canada   CAN
1939 CycleKart German "The Vulture"
I used the same video and followed the instructions as closely as I could and the results were perfect. The wheels SEEMED like they were still wobbling just a little when it was on the bench, but under actual driving, they were rock solid. No wobble at all.



"I never lose. I either win or learn.”
-Nelson Mandela

Carlos Carneiro Avatar
PHOENIX, AZ, USA   USA
2015 CycleKart American "2015 VKC Italiano"
Spokes are something that need to be checked often.
If one drives as hard as I do, "often" means before and after every run.
They normally do not become loose every time, but you never know when they will, and "better safe then sorry" should apply in this case.
A broken wheel can cause a flip.

The 2018 Campbell Cup had the worst spoke loosening conditions I've encountered at any circuit to this day.
My rear spokes were coming loose after every lap.
I was only able to get 5 laps in because I lost so much time retightening spokes in between runs.
The Campbell Cup circuit is very rough, very fast, and the cyclekart takes a tremendous beating at that circuit.
I was very fortunate the 2018 race format was 1 lap time trials, as I would certainly not have finished a multi-lap race.

The rear spokes are generally more subject to this problem because they carry more cornering loads than the front in these vehicles.
Therefore, a heavier kart such as the one I drive (316 lbs) will transfer huge amounts of stress onto the rear wheels' spokes.
However, this is true for any cyclekart as the problem is the wheels we use.
They come from a lightweight motorcycle and were not designed to get loaded at a 90 degree angle.
So check your spokes often (regardless of your cyclekart's weight). thumbs up thumbs up



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-11-30 11:24 AM by Carlos Carneiro.

Denny Graham Gold Member Dennis Graham
Sandwich, IL, USA   USA
1950 Chevrolet 3600 "Old Blue"
1954 Chevrolet 3600
Well said Carlos. You are the first one I've seen so far to openly admit the
weakness of these Honda CT90 wheels, which includes the Clones. I've been,
for two years now, planning in the back of my head, a reasonable way to manufacture
a wider hub to spread the load out. Also to be able to use a Timkin tapered bearing
rather than ball bearings that are more suited to a hand truck. An aluminum billet hub
is to expensive so castings seem to be the way to go. That would save a lot of material
and machine time.
Mike Thorpe produced a few sets of billet hubs but from what it sounded like, he got
a super deal on the material he used. When I priced it out here in the states, it was way
to expensive to be practical. I wonder if Jack and the boys have tossed this idea around,
since they appear to be offering billet steel hub adapters now for the rear.
It didn't take much to convince me of the importance of proper spoke torque with the
beating that the wheels can get at some venues.
So a Tusk torque kit is on the Christmas list this year.
Denny Graham
Sandwich, IL

Smoky Avatar
Smoky Silver Member Don Schmok
Salmon Arm, BC, Canada   CAN
My Honda rims are more than 50 years old. I drove the Campbell cup last year and this year, and I’ve never tightened a spoke.

Now all this spoke talk got me worried this year, and I rapped ‘em with a screwdriver handle, looking for loose ones, but none to be found.

My CycleKart is two years old, and has been thrashed around lots of rough gravel roads and many laps around Ed’s rough field.

When I bought my wheels from a wrecker, I didn’t know better and got all front wheels. But with adapters I bolted them up, and have been having fun ever since. My kart has spent its share of time drifting and sliding too. My CycleKart weighs 283 pounds, and me in my driving gear add another 200.

Build it, run it, and fix as needed.



1929 Riley Bitsa

Carlos Carneiro Avatar
PHOENIX, AZ, USA   USA
2015 CycleKart American "2015 VKC Italiano"
Perhaps Don's could be a classic case of "they don't build them like they used to"?
With today's standard wheels its absolutely normal and expected that the spokes will become loose at some point, and again at another.
However, everyone will have a different rate of wear and tear depending on how often, and how hard, and under what conditions their cyclekart gets driven.

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