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Not CycleKarts, Standard or Custom, but...

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moto-klasika Avatar
moto-klasika Zoran R. Pualic
Bern, Bern, Switzerland   CHE
... but some serious people made crazy vehicles and have great fun:















... and, for the end - crazy Switzerians with their racing mini-tractors:



So, not all of the Swiss people are serious bankers, swatch-makers, money-counters...
(cows shall be surprised when in September return form the hills to this field?)

Ciao,
Zoran
P.S.: Do not forget that this is The Pub, so except discussion about religion, politics and sex - everything else is allowed...



Zoran R. Pualić
(mostly living in Bern, Swiss & happy in my Belgrade, Serbia)



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-04-29 08:59 AM by moto-klasika.

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Rhysn Rhys Nolan
Tamworth, Staffordshire, UK   GBR
"Farmer Race" is amazing! Is there some reason why all have handlebar steering?

moto-klasika Avatar
moto-klasika Zoran R. Pualic
Bern, Bern, Switzerland   CHE
Hello, Rhys!
At a few sentences, there could be seen small tractors pulling trailers (here in Swiss called "anhanger"winking smiley in more-or-less standard version.
Of course, ther could be seen quite "developed" verisons...

Such small tractors are popular in Serbia (old Yugoslavia, too) - for agriculture, but even more, used by Gypsies to transport old stuff collected on streets (a simple variant of "recycling industry).
We have called them "multi-cultivators". They have everything over the front axle: engine (small two-stroke, four-stroke or diesel) and transmission.
Central pivot steering (big king-pin) is behind, with an attachment to a trailer, where driver seats (no worry about Ackermann?).
Often, there is propeller shift to live rear axle, so combination has four-wheel drive.

Because of such construction, regularly are used long steering handles with all commands on it, as for a motorcycle.
In Serbia, one back-yard workshop master made transformation installing steering wheel and some components of automobile steering.

Therefore, modified variants have the same steering combination, especially with a central-pivot steering mechanism.
It is simple, precise and direct - only, a driver is leaning to an outside of a curve, instead to an inside.

From of ex-Yugoslavian countries:









Enjoy,
Zoran



Zoran R. Pualić
(mostly living in Bern, Swiss & happy in my Belgrade, Serbia)



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-04-30 07:23 AM by moto-klasika.

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Kelly Wood Avatar
Salt Lake City, UT, USA   USA
1910 CycleKart Great Britain "Sargette"
Neat stuff, and neat to see my buddy Christopher Smith (the Diesel Weasel) I watched him build that.

CmdBentaxle Avatar
CmdBentaxle Dave D
Federal Way, WA, USA   USA
1950 CycleKart Italian "1950 Ferrari 166 F2"
That tiller steering looks like a serious workout!
Amazing collection, Zoran!
All cousins in spirit.

moto-klasika Avatar
moto-klasika Zoran R. Pualic
Bern, Bern, Switzerland   CHE
... I was near completing message and website collapsed, so I must start it again!
=====================================================================
Hello,
I am glad that three of you like my postings about strange, small, motorised vehicles, some bought and some built at home!

Obviously that their owners had fun during their construction (or buying and regular use), driving and “racing” sometime! Well said: “All cousins in spirit.”. It seems that most of us Cyclekartistes, wannabe Cyclekartistes or never-be Cyclekartistes – had similar dreams as kids and teenagers, happily (or not) realised in later age. Stevensons started with soap-box back-yard racers (gravity coasters) and evolved to CycleKart, then almost serious post-war racer replica as "Alfettina" is, and real cycle-car replica as "Buffy Parson" is, or MG B transferred into “Ferrari Barchetta”...

Kelly, your friend Christopher Smith constructed cute and unusual Diesel Weasel!
I wouldn't like diesel in my passenger car, but some small unusual construction with a diesel engine could be interesting: good torque at low revolutions, strange sound and vibrations...

In Europe, light quadricycle or three-wheeler with a diesel engine up to 4 Kilowatts could be attested and registered for road use. I am not sure if simple industrial/agricultural diesel engines could be attested, or they would ask for something more modern?
Maybe to register it as mini-tractor (here in Swiss or in back-home in Serbia) or as “Gypsy Commercial Vehicle” (only in Serbia). Just to coloured my face a little, put some garbage in a trailer – and we could fly around (in Belgrade only, not here in tidy, civilised and regulated Swiss).

So, a few videos about such “business”:




Police tolerate them a little and run after them, not too much – most of them are refugees that found a new home in Belgrade, making a few “cardboard cities”, at periphery of the city, but even in the strict centre of New Belgrade, across hotel “Intercontinental” and Congress Centre SAVA...

Following pictures I took some years ago, late Summer, the strict centre of the City, residential quarts, across Museum of Nikola Tesla (visited by my friend Peter from Oregon USA). This time, two fellows made “pick-up" of old TRABANT. We give them some money for cold beer – the hot afternoon was that day...

Ciao,
Zoran

P.S.: Rhys, do you have some good Diane - I could make a connection if you want to sell it cheaply to Belgrade gipsies... (and become their sponsor- benefactor)



Zoran R. Pualić
(mostly living in Bern, Swiss & happy in my Belgrade, Serbia)


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Rhysn Rhys Nolan
Tamworth, Staffordshire, UK   GBR
Sorry Zoran, no Dyane parts at all. I got most of mine from France when I had the car, neither cheap, nor too good in some cases!

Neto Ernest B
Berlin, OH, USA   USA
Some of those remind me of the Yanmar "Microtrator" I had in Brazil (to mow the airstrip in the village). It was a single cylinder 11 horse diesel. You sat on an implement style seat positioned above a third wheel, which you steer by means of a foot lever system, along with the hand clutches on the handle bars. It didn't go real fast, but fast enough that you could get it locked into a tight circle, and get thrown off, if you were not careful. (It could pivot on one of the drive wheels turning in one direction, and almost that tight in the other direction, I can't remember which now anymore.)

Carty McCartFace Robert J
Fresno, CA, USA   USA
I love the farmers race. Those tractors look like ridiculous fun to race.

I love that people do that. It is so goofy and cool. smiling smiley

Peace,
Robert

moto-klasika Avatar
moto-klasika Zoran R. Pualic
Bern, Bern, Switzerland   CHE
Hello, Rhys!
My father always wanted to buy Citroen 2CV – but abounded such idea: they were too expensive for its class, not enough of spare parts and if found they were ridiculously expensive. That was strange because Citroen's small masterpiece was produced in Slovenia under licence, one of the Republics of old Yugoslavia. Better said that was clever “screw-driver industry”: imported of complete cars, dis-assembled a little, assembled them and sell as domestic cars – no import duties.

Therefore my father as quite a modest man bought Zastava 750 - aka FIAT 600d made under licence in Serbia and so three times in a row!
The first was sold, the second was given to my brother Roki and the third I inherited after father's sudden death...

Before that, my brother exchange new refrigerator for very old 2CV, an engine of 425 cc and 14 HP, if I remember well. It had mechanical power for windshield wipers, by cable for speedometer! It was slow and acceleration non-existent, but quite a fun to drive, oscillating up and down a long time after hitting a bump, a hole or passed the tramway rails...
Later, he bought new Dianna and I drive it often! Quite a nice car, but again too expensive for its class, no spare parts, rusting body and even chassis...

I would still love (my wife Olga, too) to have 2CV or Diane, but they are now too expensive to have as a hobby.
I know that almost all components could be bought new made by small or big workshops, mostly for special bodies to be built on them, but...
--- ---
Hello, Robert and Ernest!
I would like to enter local (in Swiss, where I spent most of my life now) mini-tractor racing, or at least shows and parades, but...
Everything here is ridiculously expensive including old tractors (not old-timers) of any size or kind. That is too much to start and run such hobby - over my possibilities to have one.

There are a few versions with rear-wheel steering, single or in a pair. In spite that such systems sometimes were used in the history of motorisation, I am not sure in safety of such vehicles, except at very low speeds...

Attached are some photos with small tractors from Autumn festival in Swiss hills: returning cows from season's time spent at hills' grass-fields to stables...
Then there is a division of cheese – hundreds of kilograms made in some kind of community work, dealt between involved families by quite strange and complicated system...

Ciao,
Zoran



Zoran R. Pualić
(mostly living in Bern, Swiss & happy in my Belgrade, Serbia)


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chrisenamels Avatar
chrisenamels Silver Member Chris Brown
Llangadog, Carmarthenshire, UK   GBR
Zoran,

Having driven a rear wheel steer dumper I can confirm that it was "interesting". The strangest thing about it was that if you steered left your seat moved right as it rotated around the front axle, not something I'd like to drive at speed!

Chris

moto-klasika Avatar
moto-klasika Zoran R. Pualic
Bern, Bern, Switzerland   CHE
Hello, Chris!
As I said, such system was tried a lot of time in motoring history, mostly for cyclecars and bigger aerodynamic unorthodox vehicles, but...

A few more-or-less successful attempts were with pedal-powered three-wheelers and some 10-12 years ago I was interested in that. Having time, working night shift in a bank, I made a lot of sketches and calculations.
To say in a simple way: I wasn't satisfied with results (on paper).
A line of the right wheel or wheels is much bigger part of a circle than of front. In the critical situation make an almost full circle around front wheel or wheels.
Looking good for manoeuvrability, but in practice not so good. If we want to avoid some object (pedestrian, another bicycle, pole, three, kid or dog) - we should avoid it with front wheels easily but hit with the rear part of the vehicle - if do not start manoeuvre at a longer distance (planed)...

Therefore, for small tractors, dumpers (we called them "kiper"winking smiley, such system could be good and even very practical, but...
















Maybe four-wheel steering could be a compromise of manoeuvrability and safety, but over-complication for sure.



French "spider" in previously shown videos has a four-wheeled drive, independent suspension and four-wheel steering...

Ciao,
Zoran



Zoran R. Pualić
(mostly living in Bern, Swiss & happy in my Belgrade, Serbia)

moto-klasika Avatar
moto-klasika Zoran R. Pualic
Bern, Bern, Switzerland   CHE
... for Rhys and everybody else who thinks that something simpler than Grafton could be built: Bramble cyclecar (only one original example exist today), ultralight and ultrasimple quadricycle based at motorcycle side-car with the side-mounted engine!

https://web.stagram.com/p/BVB4DVlBFN_?locale=en

Ciao,
Zoran



Zoran R. Pualić
(mostly living in Bern, Swiss & happy in my Belgrade, Serbia)



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-05-07 05:04 PM by moto-klasika.


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moto-klasika Avatar
moto-klasika Zoran R. Pualic
Bern, Bern, Switzerland   CHE
......sooooo, seating in the corner of my favourite PUB, drinking Serbian black beer, mind my own business (doing nothing useful), I started to think about something serious, written in a serious topic by serious Cyclekartistes: safety of CycleKart racing or just fast running around!

From experience of Cyclekartistes (the best described by Carlos), there are two dangerous situations:

The first:
Hitting some hard object (wall, tree, electric pole, strong fence...)
Without safety belts, then without absorbing/crash volume at the front, collapsible steering-wheel shaft, proper head rest - crashes could be dangerous even at modest speeds at around 25-30 MPH.
Hitting hard object with strong and heavy chassis would result in the instant stop of entire CycleKart with driver's body moving forward at the same speed...

The second:
Rolling CycleKart at corners, too fast speed, to strong grip of tyres, too soft or uneven ground, too much of anything that went wrong...

As was said, the most dangerous could be a combination of those two situations.

However, as was said by Carlos - the most accidents happened rolling CycleKart with drivers body inside, or half-half which looks the most dangerous situation. Without good roll-bar or even roll-cage that could be fatal. Of course, that looks good at sprint/midgets, but not at CycleKarts, and technically shouldn't be an easy task to build properly...

One positive version is if shoulders and elbows stayed inside a vehicle, especially head – more about that later.

Without intents to frighten people, there are a few short films from VSCC racing in the UK – looking bad but finished relatively well:







Shown cars are much faster than our beloved CycleKarts and there is not any kind of safety equipment. Not to mention all kinds of hill-climbing/sprint hot specials. Probably that Rhys and a few other should know a lot about that, at least as observers of happenings (from their cars) if not as actors of accidents.

To simplified, long time ago (after I arrived here to Swiss), with a domestic friend I was seriously discussing down-hill racing, but Swiss rules are so detailed and complicated that we abounded that ideas. Then, my intention was to build some small coupé with a strong wooden monocoque body, with entering inside and stepping out through top – so, my body should stay always inside even when “auto” is tumbling down the side from a road.
Having 60 years then, 118 kg and 188 cm – I would prefer to stay inside of monocoque body. Some kind of belts were planed, helmet too. Speeds could be over 80 km/hour at some tracks. Obviously that I was afraid of injuries in a case of accidents, having a big and heavy body over old skeleton...

Something similar to such idea I later saw on the internet and now presented at attached photos. Only change: instead of wooden girders for body construction, I would use plywood laminated strips: broken wooden sticks/girders could be dangerous for a driver in a case of an accident: could harm badly. That way experience from crashes of early pioneer aviators. They often wrapped such wooden strips/girders with ropes or leather to avoid injuries by wooden splinters...

Besides that, I like small coupés if designed well and it is possible to make one inside of CycleKart dimensions. I calculated that total height of such coupé should be around one meter from a ground – that could still look proportional?

Just some thoughts useful for brain-fitness...

Ciao, Zoran



Zoran R. Pualić
(mostly living in Bern, Swiss & happy in my Belgrade, Serbia)



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-05-17 04:53 PM by moto-klasika.


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Smoky Avatar
Smoky Silver Member Don Schmok
Salmon Arm, BC, Canada   CAN
Well, those crashes were hard to watch.



1929 Riley Bitsa

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