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What got you started, if you have? What's kept you going?

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CmdBentaxle Avatar
CmdBentaxle Dave D
Federal Way, WA, USA   USA
1950 CycleKart Italian "1950 Ferrari 166 F2"
What exactly are you expecting out of this thing?

Are you attracted by the basic, raw, bare knuckled motoring experience it promises? Great! Me too.
The dust, the gasoline fumes, bugs in your teeth, your backside floating in mid-air above the seat over the big bumps? Fantastic. It's all there. The fright? A little of that too, if your doing it right.

How about being able to re-create your own little version of some old unattainable racing machine you've always longed to get your hands on? Being your own factory, team owner, test and race driver, making adjustments, even building and testing new components between events is an enormously satisfying part of this thing.


I have come to realize that, while most of the guys I actually drive my cyclekart with are more or less like me in what turns their crank, some may not be. And it isn't up to me to be telling anybody how to approach this hobby.
But I will say this; It is my deepest conviction that the absolute death of a cyclekart project have got to be those evil twins, Over Analysis and Over Complication.

I know. Brother, do I know. Other more important things take precedence.
All the more reason to adhere to an simple, and thus more achievable order of constuction.
There are examples of basic and effective ways of tackling every job on a cyclekart on these pages. Look at the build journals. Copy what's adaptable to your car.

About that car. What's your Inspiration? Don't have one yet? Because you can't decide or because you can't think of anything. Make a decision. You will progress more steadily with your imagination fixed on a definate objective. If you can't even think of one, then frankly I don't know why you'd bother, but to me these are all about replication. The point is, an image of what you want to end up with will inspire you onward.

I know, some will say "for me, most of the enjoyment is in the build." Whatever. In 40yrs of model aviation I knew a lot of guys that said that. They were the guys that never finished a damned thing, always moping on the sidelines.

I want you out there tearing around with the rest of us!

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Woodysrods Avatar
Woodysrods Silver Member Brian Woods
Westbank B.C., Canada   CAN
Been missing you Dave.
Welcome back!
Brian

Denny Graham Gold Member Dennis Graham
Sandwich, IL, USA   USA
1950 Chevrolet 3600 "Old Blue"
1954 Chevrolet 3600
Can't get to sleep last night Dave?? Good read, very inspiring and I'd go along with most
of what ya wrote. Cept the part about "guys who enjoy the details of the build" as being the
killer of a project.
There are those of us that derive more pleasure spending time in the shop than the social
activities afterward. And some of us do stay interested to the finish of our projects.......we
just have to live long enough to finish all of them.
Probably the most ambitious project I ever took on was my scratch Pitts biplane. That
took a full time commitment for nearly three years. I had to learn how the old tube and
fabric planes were built and study the principals of aerodynamics, (When I started I
had but a basic understanding of Bernoulli's principle because of my work with
carburetion. My only exposure to flight or model airplanes was with Revell plastic
back when I was a pre-teen.)
Once she was finished and at the airport, I had to teach myself how to fly a hot rod airplane.
First right side up, then upside down. The only flight training I'd had to that point was my
basic 40 hours to get my private license and a few more in a rented 150 Cessna. The next
three years and 500 hours I spent flying it in IAC competition. As I look back on it now, that
time with the IAC was much less rewarding than the 2,000 hours I spent building it.
The most memorable times I spent in the air were when we were alone playing in the clouds.
Oh yeah....during that period I did also manage move to the airport, built a house and
hanger (did all that work myself, cept for some of the heavy lifting.), and still put in my
required 40 hours at the salt mine to put food on the table.
So, after I'd been there and done that, it was time to move on to something new that
drew my interest, which for the last decade plus a few, has been restoring Chevy Stovebolts.
I'm slowed down a bunch since I've reached my golden years, and Shangri La, which I took on
six years ago might not get finished. After all, I've only got 24 more years to get it done.
And I can't leave out those hundred other construction projects thrown in just to keep it interesting,
such as a Cyclekart, which by the way.....will get finished....someday.
Nope.....not all of us abandon our projects when they draw into months and years. For me,
and a lot of other type A's, the time to pack it in is when it's finished and begins to get boring.
Then sticking with the project is just work!
Denny Graham
Sandwich, IL



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-12-18 05:49 AM by Denny Graham.

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Kelly Wood Avatar
Salt Lake City, UT, USA   USA
1910 CycleKart Great Britain "Sargette"
Looking at Dave... "Yep, what Dave said."


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Woodysrods Avatar
Woodysrods Silver Member Brian Woods
Westbank B.C., Canada   CAN
Hi Kelly
How is your new CK coming along?
And are you planning for Tieton this year?
Brian

Kelly Wood Avatar
Salt Lake City, UT, USA   USA
1910 CycleKart Great Britain "Sargette"
Hey!

I'll post an update on the ones I have. I have 4.

And yes, if welcome... I'd love to come up.

Woodysrods Avatar
Woodysrods Silver Member Brian Woods
Westbank B.C., Canada   CAN
In reply to # 36742 by Kelly Wood Hey!

I'll post an update on the ones I have. I have 4.

And yes, if welcome... I'd love to come up.
We are all dieing to meet you in person!
And I am sure you will be more than welcome!
Brian



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-12-18 02:10 PM by Woodysrods.

Slyme Dawg Avatar
Slyme Dawg Ryan Hanegan
Sultan, WA, USA   USA
Dave,

You were a significant factor in my getting involved with Cycle Karts. That and having a buddy with a track perfect for the Karts. I can't wait to see you guys and more on the track soon.

Ryan
Promoter and Flag Man
Slyme Dawg Invitational Speedway


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CmdBentaxle Avatar
CmdBentaxle Dave D
Federal Way, WA, USA   USA
1950 CycleKart Italian "1950 Ferrari 166 F2"
Denny, just that Pitts project alone took a dogged determination that I know to be uncommon, and I see you
as a guy who relentlessly forges on to achieve his aims. My reference was to the fellow (and we all know them)
who finds himself stymied, unable to make progress do to being buried in indecision. Of course the build should be captivating and enjoyable. Otherwise it will become boring, with the same result. Work stoppage.

I suspect there are many who have ground to a halt, or nearly so.
Let's say or do what we can to jumpstart them.

Kelly Wood Avatar
Salt Lake City, UT, USA   USA
1910 CycleKart Great Britain "Sargette"
After watching a lot of builds, I've started to notice a few things personally.

I'm noticing that yes, the builds are wonderful. They're absolutely great creations... However, some are so overbuilt that they become stronger than a mid sized utility trailer which handles far more abuse. You'll never ever break it... or go fast either.

With my rides, and I'm no pro... I'm finding that the lighter more playful flimsiness actually more fun. You feel it, you can tell what it's going to do which leads to that white-knuckled experience some may be looking for.

A simple bit of advice; Don't overthink it, and have fun. These little things can take some abuse in their simplest form. The original formula is the most fun I think.... like this one. 700 bucks to build and it'll take a beating.


I built it for our group here to show that the simplest components (and not one Grade 8 bolt is on it mind you) and it will give you a smile... and others too.

It's just plain fun to drive.





In reply to # 36754 by CmdBentaxle Denny, just that Pitts project alone took a dogged determination that I know to be uncommon, and I see you
as a guy who relentlessly forges on to achieve his aims. My reference was to the fellow (and we all know them)
who finds himself stymied, unable to make progress do to being buried in indecision. Of course the build should be captivating and enjoyable. Otherwise it will become boring, with the same result. Work stoppage.

I suspect there are many who have ground to a halt, or nearly so.
Let's say or do what we can to jumpstart them.


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littletex Avatar
littletex Blake Martindale
Azle, TX, USA   USA
LittleTex here,
I suppose for me it's the viserile feel of driving knowing you have to manhandle it I also love the hunt for parts when I look at something not for what it is but for what I can make it be for my project the creativity of it all. While yes we all look forward to the end goal of driving it when it's done as for me my father had an old adage son sometime its not about where you going but where you end up and what you experienced along the journey and the goal is just a bonus. I to tried my hand at model aviation (RC Planes) never really learned to fly wasn't good at it but I loved the creativity of the build and using the strangest of thing to make the details come alive. All the planes I built at the hand of an experienced pilot were told to me to be built well and easy to fly and handle and looked impressive for a novice. As for the over thinking it I see that as public enemy No. 1 an infectious disease that most of us have and try hard to fight. It can take the best of intentions and ideas and destroy you and your project what's the fun in that? Even If I never finish this I will never have regrets about the journey it's fun and I'm learning a lot about different skills but mostly about myself but no matter what the end result is I win.

1908Rick Avatar
1908Rick Rick Eggers
Cape Coral, FL, USA   USA
I guess I'm the oddball in this group.

I over-analyzed and over-complicated it, and I finished it.
I find great enjoyment in the build, and I finished it.
I over-thought it and didn't fail.
I made it much more complicated than the basic kart, yet it's light and nimble and quick. And I finished it.

I'm looking to bring it to Tieton next June. Do you guys think it would be accepted? eye rolling smiley


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Woodysrods Avatar
Woodysrods Silver Member Brian Woods
Westbank B.C., Canada   CAN
Hi Rickthumbs upthumbs up
Dave will be the first one you should let drive your Miller, as he will be the first to offer up his CK for you to drive.
Next will be Dennis.....and the ME!smileys with beer
Good Roads
Brian

littletex Avatar
littletex Blake Martindale
Azle, TX, USA   USA
Little Tex here,
I saw this poster on the net the other day and Dave you instantly came to mind can't imagine why look familiar?


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CmdBentaxle Avatar
CmdBentaxle Dave D
Federal Way, WA, USA   USA
1950 CycleKart Italian "1950 Ferrari 166 F2"
Rick, judging by the result, you weren't OVER doing anything. For you. You were clearly building well within your expertise.
I'll point out that I didn't exactly take the most elementary path myself. Like you, I had to go and design my own front suspension. My bolted aluminum frame is, to say the least, unconventional. My bodywork completely off the beaten path. Now, what kind of hypocrite would I be to suggest that all of us only build the simplest machine we knew how? I love seeing the tricky challenges worked out, and I'm not advocating any dumbing down of the average C/K build.

My promotion of the basic route is mainly directed to those who may be bogged down and discouraged. Not to condescend, but a simple machine on the track this year, is alot more fun than a
complex machine in the shop for the next 5.

Build to your resources and abilities, not someone else's.

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