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12V Power Source Question

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Woodysrods Silver Member Brian Woods
Westbank B.C., Canada   CAN
Generator or alternator has not yet factored into my thoughts.
More moving parts + extra pieces = more weight.
Brian

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CmdBentaxle Avatar
CmdBentaxle Dave D
Federal Way, WA, USA   USA
1950 CycleKart Italian "1950 Ferrari 166 F2"
How much air does the stock fan move? Denny, that's a good question. Who knows. But those stock fans have way more efficient blades than those on the billet wheels a lot of guys use. I've never had heat troubles with the stock fan, but I don't invite them with prolonged idling either. Why would you? Especially with a staged up engine with advanced timing. Haven't run the ARC wheel yet but won't be surprised if it runs hotter.

Woodysrods Silver Member Brian Woods
Westbank B.C., Canada   CAN
Arc Wheel Dave?
Is that the white plastic replacement fan that come with the NR Racing stage one kit?
Brian



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-12-29 05:49 PM by Woodysrods.

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CmdBentaxle Avatar
CmdBentaxle Dave D
Federal Way, WA, USA   USA
1950 CycleKart Italian "1950 Ferrari 166 F2"
Sorry, The ARC Racing billet aluminum flywheel is what I have now.

Neto Ernest B
Berlin, OH, USA   USA
In reply to # 28295 by Woodysrods Generator or alternator has not yet factored into my thoughts.
More moving parts + extra pieces = more weight.
Brian

My thinking was along the lines of coupling a small generator with a smaller battery, so thought perhaps the total weight might come out to be an advantage. I had a Yanmar micro tractor that I used to mow the airstrip at the mission station where we lived in the Amazon (in the village of a small isolated tribe), and it had a small generator built into the 11 hp single cylinder diesel engine, no battery. I never dismantled the engine enough to have taken the generator off, but it was pretty small. The engine was manual crank, so the only thing the generator operated was a headlight. I would think that a headlight would take more power than a fan. Maybe a battery is not necessary at all (unless you want power start).

carChips Avatar
carChips Victor Harnish
Kelowna, BC, Canada   CAN
1933 MG Magnette
1973 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "Chip"
1989 GMC Sierra 1500 "Bush Truck"
Brian, did I send you a PM?



S'all for now!

Woodysrods Silver Member Brian Woods
Westbank B.C., Canada   CAN
In reply to # 28304 by carChips Brian, did I send you a PM?
Hi Vic
Yes, but there was no specs on the charge coil you mentioned, and I later found out that Preditor 212 motors don't have charging capabilities built into their flywheel. More work that I don't want to get into.
Thanks
Brian

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carChips Avatar
carChips Victor Harnish
Kelowna, BC, Canada   CAN
1933 MG Magnette
1973 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "Chip"
1989 GMC Sierra 1500 "Bush Truck"
The same mag that runs the ignition, runs the charge coil.

I have a GX 200 that it will fit, if you change your mind.



S'all for now!

greggkishline Gregg Kishline
Kenosha, WI, USA   USA
A thought on circulating air in/out of the tail ... I assume you're goal is to reduce heat-buildup in the bodywork of the 'closed' tail - to prevent over-heating. This has been a problem in scaled cars for a long time. When quarter midgets were raced on the East Coast in the 1950s, it was common to remove the tails to enable cooling. I've built and restored these cars. After a customer complained about heat build-up (gas in his carburetor percolated), I attacked his problem and solved it. The issue is heat build-up in an operating environment that is largely closed. There are two sources: 1) Heat drawn off the engine cooling fins, and 2) heat radiated off the exhaust piping . I chose to attack the exhaust system. I removed the custom exhaust header and muffler and jacketed the whole length of the system with another layer of tubing, rather like a thermos bottle. I made sure that the exit of the exhaust gas from the muffler was fully clear of the body work - there was no opportunity for burned gases to mix with engine-cooling air. Finally, I wrapped the exhaust header/pipe/muffler with fiberglass heat tape - to minimize radiant transfer within the tail. More heat exited at the exhaust outlet. The reduced heat load in the tail was enough to solve the build-up problem. One source for the heat tape: https://www.speedwaymotors.com/Thermo-Tec-11021-Header-Wrap-1-Inch-x-50-Ft-Black-Color,7046.html

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Denny Graham Gold Member Dennis Graham
Sandwich, IL, USA   USA
1950 Chevrolet 3600 "Old Blue"
1954 Chevrolet 3600
Well that certainly makes sense Gregg. With approximately half the heat
in an direct cooled engine being dissipated thru the exhaust, the 18 to 24
inches of pipe I see on a lot of the karts makes for one heck of a heat
exchanger, most of which is right inside of the tail section.
A few of the karts featured here on the forum have taken advantage
of the heat wrap tapes. That has to make a huge difference.
Denny Graham
Sandwich, IL

Woodysrods Silver Member Brian Woods
Westbank B.C., Canada   CAN
Thanks Gregg
I fully agree with that theory and solution.
Did you wrap the outside of the jacket and/or the actual header tube.
And what size variance did you use between the jacket and header pipes?
Brian

greggkishline Gregg Kishline
Kenosha, WI, USA   USA
I wrapped the entire exhaust header and pipe - not sure about the muffler, but it should be outside the bodywork anyhow. The wrapping was only on the outside of the jacket, and safety-wired in place. The air gap between the exhaust pipe and the outer jacket was 1/8 to 1/4".

Sorry,I did not take any pictures of the finished pipe. Here it is - before I added the jacket and wrapped it


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DSCF0878.JPG    45.6 KB
DSCF0878.JPG

Woodysrods Silver Member Brian Woods
Westbank B.C., Canada   CAN
Thanks Gregg
Love your gas tank solution for the tail space.
Brian

Denny Graham Gold Member Dennis Graham
Sandwich, IL, USA   USA
1950 Chevrolet 3600 "Old Blue"
1954 Chevrolet 3600
Small engine design certainly has come a long way from
those early Briggs side valve engines.
dg

Woodysrods Silver Member Brian Woods
Westbank B.C., Canada   CAN
I got my new batteries and fan the other day, so spent some bench time with them yesterday.
Fan weighs 2.2 lbs, and the combined weight of the batteries is 1.2 lbs.
Cut off the leads they cam with and hooked them up in parallel and checked out the output on my voltmeter (not that good with it, but did figure it out...I think).....so I got 12V out of them and they are listed at 4500 mAH so I was assuming that they would (in parallel) put out 9 amps???But, couldn't figure out how to get that reading on my old voltmeter.
They ran my new GPS speedometer just fine it seems, but did not run my "Fan"......it ran flawlessly when hooked up to my deep cycle battery from my Teardrop Trailer. Move a ton of air!
Fan is listed at 80W.
I don't know why there are so many different units for electrical stuff.......Amps, Volts, Watts, etc. ?????? To many conversions to make to see if you are buying something adequate for the job.angry smiley
Brian

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