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Just.....one more tool for the tool box....that's all I need!

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Denny Graham Gold Member Dennis Graham
Sandwich, IL, USA   USA
1950 Chevrolet 3600 "Old Blue"
1954 Chevrolet 3600
Well, the wheel is done, the planishing hammer is done, the
powered bead roller is finished, the HF shrinkers/stretcher’s are
mounted on a foot stand, the ring roller is mounted, made a leather
shot bag and loaded it with #9 lead shot, got the stump hollowed out
and made up a tucking fork and a dozen T-dollies, hold on while I
take a breath……………
Now, the only thing left for my coach builders toolbox are some home made
hammers and mallets. I’ve seen Wray Schelin using a hammer he made from
a wood baseball bat, (try to find one of those now a days) so I spun up a
shillelagh out of some of my Ash fire wood on my Delta wood lathe.
The missing link is HOW TO ATTACH IT TO THE ASH WOOD HANDLE,
that I’ve whittled out of another piece of wood I stole from the pig?

And……I’m turning a round head 3” ash mallet while I'm at it, and a couple
of Delrin heads from left overs on the shelf, which also will need handles.
Same dilemma applies to those. i.e., how can they be solidly attached to a
wood handle.
Steel heads uses a reverse taper forged into them with a wedge and
square Crown mallets can be made by gluing up two halves or in three pieces
so a tapered pocket is easy to carve into them. A reverse tapered pocket can
be chiseled out as I’ve done with this solid wood jointer's mallet but there has to
be an easier way to attach a handle to the "mini bat".
Come on guys, goggle has failed me this morning, I know some of you are
avid wood workers and probably have made mallets for your own use.
Denny Graham
Sandwich, IL

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Attachments:
Jointers Mallet & Mini Bat 01.JPG    41.9 KB
Jointers Mallet & Mini Bat 01.JPG

chrisenamels Avatar
chrisenamels Silver Member Chris Brown
Llangadog, Carmarthenshire, UK   GBR
Perhaps a step drill would do the job Denny, or at least give you a good starting point.

Chris

Speeddemon Avatar
Speeddemon Louis Poleet (Suspended)
Roslindale, MA, USA   USA
1970 CycleKart Custom "Rose"
Hi denny I just use steel wedge tru the top of handle and a little dap con glue .around the handle before mounting the wood hammer head . google n check out pbs /the woodrights shop. For better info you seek .cheers



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 2018-03-05 11:45 AM by Speeddemon.

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fatfendertruck Tony Sanchez
Show Low, AZ, USA   USA
Some ideas for your tool box.


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Denny Graham Gold Member Dennis Graham
Sandwich, IL, USA   USA
1950 Chevrolet 3600 "Old Blue"
1954 Chevrolet 3600
Thanks a lot Tony.......here I thought I was done making tools and could get back to work
on the Riley before the grass started to sprout.
I like you shot bag table. I've got a nice one planed using the last of the school bus brake
drums that I have in the shop for a base. I planned to put a tray under the table top but I'm
sure I will get some ideas from you pictures, thanks.
If you made those mallets, what method did you use to fasten the heads to the handle????
I've got a pretty good assortment of metal slappers and I've made a couple of wood/leather
ones, but want to carve out a few more shapes before I'm finished.
As I posted to Vitaily, the 20's race cars did not use a lot of compound curves, The tail mostly
and a little work on the grill shell. So...I don't really need a full compliment of coach building
tools, besides, I don't have the time left in the hour glass to learn how to use them all.
Thanks for the pics, always like to see lots of other ideas.
Denny Graham
Sandwich, IL

Denny Graham Gold Member Dennis Graham
Sandwich, IL, USA   USA
1950 Chevrolet 3600 "Old Blue"
1954 Chevrolet 3600
Well I was gonna quit but Anthony just had to get me goin'!!!!!!
Took the afternoon and went thru my pile of firewood. Picked out
four reasonable decent pieces and re-sawed them, planed them,
bandsawed them, draw knifed them, sanded them, and they're
hung out to dry with a fresh coat of Linsed Oil on them. Tomorrow
I'll tack the leather on the other three.
DG


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Ash Slappers 07.JPG    49.4 KB
Ash Slappers 07.JPG

Denny Graham Gold Member Dennis Graham
Sandwich, IL, USA   USA
1950 Chevrolet 3600 "Old Blue"
1954 Chevrolet 3600
Ok, a little more about the tools used to build “my” Cyclekart.
Now be forewarned, if you are of the minimalist mind set, then don’t bother reading or
commenting any further. I’m posting this stuff mostly for any young newbie to fabrication
who may be wondering how some of the more involved procedures can be carried out in
his home shop one day as he adds to his tool inventory..
Most experienced panel beaters will agree that it is much quicker to fabricate a ‘fat fender’
such as might be found on vehicles shortly post-WWII or pre-war, in several sections.
Rather than try to form all of the complex shape in one panel it’s much easier and quicker
to form several sections and weld them together.
Well, the same is true of many tube bends, such as exhaust, or body skeleton. So…that’s
the stage I’m at now with my Riley Monoposto build. I’ll post a few pictures of the body
support hoops that I’m making from 4130 .035” wall tubing, which I had left over from a
previous project. The seat back was simple enough, just a 10” radius bend made in a
Harbor Freight Ring Roller. The smallest die supplied with the unit is 1” and I needed a
set of ¾” dies, Those I turned in a 16” 100 year old L&S lathe that I rescued decades ago.
Then it’s only a matter of rolling out the hoop. The advantage of doing this over attempting
to bend it with a conduit bender or trying to bend it round a wood form is that it will not
flatten or kink the tube. It keeps the tube perfectly round in the bend and you have
complete control over the bend radius.
The dash, fire wall and radiator hoops are a different matter. The large sweeping radius
over the top can be done in the Ring Roller, but the tight corner radius bends are to tight.
For those bends I used a Greenlee Bender I bought many years ago when I got discharged
from the service. I used this bender to make many parts for the midgets that we used to
play with and some bends on the planes I built and…..lots of other projects. The corner
bends are made using a 3” radius tubing die with a follower to keep the tube trapped 360°
so it doesn’t collapse the tube. Then the two legs with the tight bends will be cut to blend
into the top bend and welded together. Mush easier than trying to make all three bend
in one tube with no seams. I wouldn’t use this if it were a structural member but for a
body support hoop, it’s just fine.
Denny Graham
Sandwich, IL

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Rolling 4130 Seat Back Hoop 02.JPG

HF Ring Roller Dies .750 dia 03.JPG    47.4 KB
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Rolling 4130 Seat Back Hoop 01.JPG    45.9 KB
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Body Hoop Mockup 06.JPG    52.5 KB
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smallboregarage Avatar
smallboregarage Chuck Kraeuter
Portland, OR, USA   USA
Thanks Denny. It really is nice to see parts and karts taking shape. No need now for sugar in my coffee.

Dave 46 Robert Davison
Toppenish, WA, USA   USA
I really like the looks of your stand for your shot bag and hammers. They had a similar one at a Gene Windfield metal working class I went to a few years ago. I've got the makings for one but keep looking for a round cutout at the scrap yard that I go to that sets the nifty pieces aside and sells them. I've picked up a lot of metal working pieces in the past couple of years including English wheel, bead roller and a small brake.

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Notso-Chinsee Avatar
Notso-Chinsee Gold Member Albert Lies
Spokane Valley, Washington (WA), USA   USA
1927 CycleKart American
1938 CycleKart American "Burd Piston Ring Special"
I will say you have collected and build an amazing number of beautiful tools. One thing you have said about yourself and I fit in the same category is not having many more years remaining to use what we have. Denny please take more time enjoying the efforts. I know you understand the pleasure that comes from using them and put the same pride into something we can all enjoy with you. I think many would travel just to partake in a little elbow to elbow and wheel to wheel fun.



Al Lies
The "Not-So Chinsee" guy

McFuF Patrick Mc
Lakeside, CA, USA   USA
Maybe I never noticed before but aren't most hammers only tapered on the sides and straight through on the front and back? If so couldn't you just cut the taper by drilling a line of holes in the drill press then slightly rotating the head in your vise and drilling the other side? Then just clean up the sides with a chisel.

Denny Graham Gold Member Dennis Graham
Sandwich, IL, USA   USA
1950 Chevrolet 3600 "Old Blue"
1954 Chevrolet 3600
Okey dokey........finished up the disk brake hubs and was trying to decide on what would be the bullet proof way
of bolting the disk on. Lock washers....not reliable enough....locktite, maybe, but might loosen up if they got real
toasty, Safety wire....yep, can't go wrong with safety wire. But.....drilled bolts are expensive if you're gonna have
a good variety of them on hand. Sooooooo....drill your own!
Easier said than done if you've ever tried drilling thru grade 8 bolt heads with a 1/16th in drill.
Well, looking on the net yielded several jigs but only one that looked like it would work for a range
of bolt sizes. Only problem was.....forty or fifty bucks plus shipping and handling means another
sixty or seventy out from my stash under the mattress.
So make your own jig. Which I did yesterday, finished it up this morning and spent an hour or so
punching holes in a few dozen bolts.
One more tool I can add to the shop this winter, now all I need to do is......build a cyclekart to use
all those new tools on!
dg


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