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Changing wheel bearings

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chrisenamels Avatar
chrisenamels Silver Member Chris Brown
Llangadog, Carmarthenshire, UK   GBR
A private message from Zoran prompted me to start this thread, it's easier to cover the subject in a thread than in a reply to the message, and it may be of interest to others.

Out of curiosity I looked at YouTube for removal methods, I used the normal work your way round whacking the inner with a drift until the bearing falls out. What I found was an easier way of doing it, allowing you to hit centrally in the bearing:

My set up for fitting bearings is shown in the photos below, both the bearings and the bolts were kept in the freezer for a couple of days, then the bearings were fitted using a spanner and ratchet. When fitting the second bearing the spacer was slipped over the bolt after the bearing. The spacers are made from 1" (25mm) perspex as I happened to have some (Mam "what are you going to use that for?" Me "it'll come in useful for something"winking smiley, roughly 10" x 24" of 1" perspex for £10 isn't to be passed up.

Chris

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carChips Avatar
carChips Victor Harnish
Kelowna, BC, Canada   CAN
1933 MG Magnette
1973 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "Chip"
1989 GMC Sierra 1500 "Bush Truck"
chrisenamels Avatar
chrisenamels Silver Member Chris Brown
Llangadog, Carmarthenshire, UK   GBR
Thanks Vic, that's the engineers way of doing it, but the Rawlbolt method is a lot cheaper if you're not going to make a habit of changing bearings: https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Projecting-Bolt-Shield-Anchor-Wall-Heavy-Duty-Fixing-Brick-Masonry-Rawl/201384283427?epid=1246999741&hash=item2ee3704d23:m:mb4DZZJjtm83T6yZuccmDnQ.

Chris

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Carty McCartFace Robert J
Fresno, CA, USA   USA
We always used socket wrenches and bench vises or presses to insert cartridge style bearings.

There is always a socket wrench that exactly fits the od of the bearing to be driven, and the flat back of the socket provides a lovely protection against bearing damage.

Alternatively a bolt can be threaded through the center of the socket(s) with large washers and used sans bench vise or press.

I have no simple trick for extracting them. For that it has always been the “drift around the edges” technique.smiling smiley

Peace,
Robert

moto-klasika Avatar
moto-klasika Zoran R. Pualic
Bern, Bern, Switzerland   CHE
Hello, Chris!
Thank you for useful information!
Old truth: if we do not know something it is good to ask people who know that, or know people who could know...

If my older brother is still alive, I could ask him: from early youth he started to drive, race and repair mopeds, motorcycles and automobiles - and so until the end. I was his "assistant" bringing tools form basement or balcony (we worked in a backyard of a big building where we lived), then cigarettes and beer from a nearby shop, lighting his cigarettes when his hands were oily and dirty, helping a little here and there, mostly making him company. My experience was in driving a few models of mopeds and scooters, across and around Belgrade, with some modest amateur racing here and there... I learned a lot from him, but most of that I forgot!

For pulling-out bearings from hubs, we used tools similar to suggested by Vick -"positive/males" as shown, some "negative/females" for pulling bearings of the axle. We called them "radapciger" - probably some Germanism as many of workmen's words and phrases for tools and operation.

I suppose that the first bearing is difficult to pull-out without proper tools, but the second would go easily?
I remember when some back-yard "master" was hitting 3 hours my poor washing machine to remove the old and bad bearing, using a big screwdriver and even bigger hammer... neighbours became nervous and I must help him with my humble dilettante advice...
--- ---
On the internet is shown many similar or different ways, some very primitive - we used all of them, depending on tools that we had or could borrow.
As I remember, it was easy to pull-out axles from bearings?

Thank you all!

Ciao,
Zoran



Zoran R. Pualić
(mostly living in Bern, Swiss & happy in my Belgrade, Serbia)

CmdBentaxle Avatar
CmdBentaxle Dave D
Federal Way, WA, USA   USA
1950 CycleKart Italian "1950 Ferrari 166 F2"
For removal, I find expanding the hub with a propane torch will make any method much easier.
Somtimes just a couple of taps and it falls out.
For installation, chill the bearings overnight in the freezer and once again, warm up the hub.

Rhysn Rhys Nolan
Tamworth, Staffordshire, UK   GBR
Every bearing "specialist" I have spoken to says that if you want to re-use the bearing you MUST drive the outer race, not the inner. I guess as we are changing them it doesn't matter. I use an old bearing as the driver to tap them back in. I changed all 4 bearings today in less than 5 minutes.

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Denny Graham Silver Member Dennis Graham
Sandwich, IL, USA   USA
1950 Chevrolet 3600 "Old Blue"
1954 Chevrolet 3600
deleted as per Rhys Nolan request.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-04-24 05:24 AM by Denny Graham.

chrisenamels Avatar
chrisenamels Silver Member Chris Brown
Llangadog, Carmarthenshire, UK   GBR
The advantage of using a bolt (in my case the bolt that'll be the spindle), spacers, and washers, is that the bearings are pulled in square. A temperature difference is a great help for easy fitment, which is why the bearings and bolts were put in the freezer. The reason I cooled the bolts was to help keep the bearings cool, as they are small section they warmed up quite quickly the first time I tried to fit them by the method everyone else is suggesting.

Chris

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Denny Graham Silver Member Dennis Graham
Sandwich, IL, USA   USA
1950 Chevrolet 3600 "Old Blue"
1954 Chevrolet 3600
deleted as per Rhys Nolan request.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-04-24 05:25 AM by Denny Graham.

Neto Ernest B
Berlin, OH, USA   USA
In reply to # 32470 by Rhysn Every bearing "specialist" I have spoken to says that if you want to re-use the bearing you MUST drive the outer race, not the inner. I guess as we are changing them it doesn't matter. I use an old bearing as the driver to tap them back in. I changed all 4 bearings today in less than 5 minutes.

I certainly understand why this is said, but sometimes it is not possible to get access to the outer race. Would you say that using a press (instead of driving it out with a drift & hammer) mitigates this rule somewhat? (I recently had to press a bearing out that way, and although it had seemed to be bad, after cleaning it out, it seems like it is OK after all.)

moto-klasika Avatar
moto-klasika Zoran R. Pualic
Bern, Bern, Switzerland   CHE
Hello, there!
Thank you all for additional information about changing ball-bearings!

When the time comes (if), I would check outside diameter of TOMOS moped wheels and choose bearings with bigger inside diameter.
In spite that 10 mm axle looks possible, for two of us (heavy pensioners), there should be better to have something stronger, especially at the front. For my variant, support at both sides of rear wheels is possible, with power as for mopeds - directly to each of wheels by chains, the same as brass-era automobiles.

There could choose between 17 mm ID and 35 mm OD, or 20 mm ID and 37 mm OD - and a few other combinations.

This Electric Scooter Part company from the USA is well-known for components and parts for electric-powered light vehicles and has quite a good assortment of ball-barings:

http://www.electricscooterparts.com/wheelbearings.html

Pay attention: at the bottom of a page is the calculator for transfer of inches to millimetres, with the comparative table of inch fractions and inch decimals!

Then there is the same calculator on the special page:

http://www.electricscooterparts.com/conversioncalculator.html

Then, a lot of calculators for comparing the International system of measures with Colonial system, with some tutorials for repairs:

http://www.electricscooterparts.com/electricscooterrepairhelp.html

Of course, for making precise machine-tooled parts - that isn't fully useful as there is always the small difference that couldn't be neglected. But all this is good for comparations.
(masters of the machine-tool workshop should know better than me)

When you are visiting shown pages, you could search through their catalogue of components and parts: some could be used for making CycleKarts more practical or stylish?

http://www.electricscooterparts.com/index.html

Ciao,
Zoran

P.S.: I am in no way connected with this Company nor have any financial interest if somebody deals with them after my message.



Zoran R. Pualić
(mostly living in Bern, Swiss & happy in my Belgrade, Serbia)

moto-klasika Avatar
moto-klasika Zoran R. Pualic
Bern, Bern, Switzerland   CHE
P.S.: Calculator just for Americans: conversion of inch decimals to inch fractions:

http://www.electricscooterparts.com/decimal-to-fraction-conversion-calculator.html

and, one simplified instruction for changing bearings:

http://www.electricscooterparts.com/wheelbearinginstallation.html

Z.



Zoran R. Pualić
(mostly living in Bern, Swiss & happy in my Belgrade, Serbia)

chrisenamels Avatar
chrisenamels Silver Member Chris Brown
Llangadog, Carmarthenshire, UK   GBR
Zoran,

You may be limited in your choice of bearing, from a quick search it appears that Tomos mopeds used 30mm OD bearings, those come with either 10mm or 17mm bores. Some wheeld don't use sealed bearings but cycle type cup and cone ones, but they can be converted: https://www.mopedarmy.com/wiki/Sealed_bearing_conversion.

Chris

moto-klasika Avatar
moto-klasika Zoran R. Pualic
Bern, Bern, Switzerland   CHE
In reply to # 32618 by chrisenamels Zoran,
You may be limited in your choice of bearing, from a quick search it appears that Tomos mopeds used 30mm OD bearings, those come with either 10mm or 17mm bores. Some wheels don't use sealed bearings but cycle type cup and cone ones, but they can be converted: https://www.mopedarmy.com/wiki/Sealed_bearing_conversion
Chris
=================================================================
Hello, Chris!
Thank you for doing my homework - I should do that long time ago (TOMOS was made in Slovenia, once part of my old Yugoslavia) and wheels are quite available even now.
However, as I wrote a few times, my quadricycle is still in fog in clouds - quite an uncertain project.

Couldn't imagine that OD is so small? So, there wouldn't be too many choices to install new bearings with bigger ID... (only 15 mm ID and 32 mm OD, as I found)
However, there could be a possibility to use some other light and cheap wheels with a diameter of axel from 17 to 20 mm - or to use support on both sides of axles, depending on a style of quadricycle.
Some cyclecars had such systems, but even more some of the old veteran light automobiles...

I still have in Belgrade two 18" wheels from my son's abounded JAWA 350 cc and probably a few 16" wheels of MZ 175 cc, in the basement of the building where my late brother lived.
Besides that, there are a couple of motorcycle junk-yards and I know a few friends involved in collecting of old motorcycles...

Here in Swiss, I couldn't find such possibilities and besides that - everything is unreasonably expensive. For instance, non-working mopeds are around 600-700 Swiss Franks (almost the same value in $$$)

But, for now all that is behind horizon because of non-technical reasons...


Ciao,
Zoran



Zoran R. Pualić
(mostly living in Bern, Swiss & happy in my Belgrade, Serbia)

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