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Carty McCartFace Robert J
Fresno, CA, USA   USA
Ernest,

Part of the fun of conversing with others, to me, is the wandering. No telling what memories, dreams, projects, etc. may be awakened or sparked by reading or seeing something from someone else.

Of course, I’m still trying to figure out how you used a chair for a steering wheel... smiling smiley

Next time, a piece of string wrapped around the bundle will keep the lams in line, and can actually be used as the clamp itself if the string is strong enough and wrapped tightly enough.

Peace,
Robert

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chrisenamels Avatar
chrisenamels Silver Member Chris Brown
Llangadog, Carmarthenshire, UK   GBR
Robert,

A thin dowel through the laminations at the mid point will stop them sliding, without introducing a weak spot. Make it just a little shorter than the total depth of the laminations, so it doesn’t affect the clamping, 1/8" (3.2mm) diameter would be plenty thick enough.

Just to be clear, that's a wooden dowel I'm talking about.

Chris



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-05-11 08:11 AM by chrisenamels.

Neto Ernest B
Berlin, OH, USA   USA
In reply to # 33190 by Carty McCartFace Ernest,

Part of the fun of conversing with others, to me, is the wandering. No telling what memories, dreams, projects, etc. may be awakened or sparked by reading or seeing something from someone else.

Of course, I’m still trying to figure out how you used a chair for a steering wheel... smiling smiley

Next time, a piece of string wrapped around the bundle will keep the lams in line, and can actually be used as the clamp itself if the string is strong enough and wrapped tightly enough.

Peace,
Robert

Yeah, I can't quite picture that myself (chair as steering wheel).....

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Carty McCartFace Robert J
Fresno, CA, USA   USA
In reply to # 33193 by Neto
In reply to # 33190 by Carty McCartFace Ernest,

Part of the fun of conversing with others, to me, is the wandering. No telling what memories, dreams, projects, etc. may be awakened or sparked by reading or seeing something from someone else.

Of course, I’m still trying to figure out how you used a chair for a steering wheel... smiling smiley

Next time, a piece of string wrapped around the bundle will keep the lams in line, and can actually be used as the clamp itself if the string is strong enough and wrapped tightly enough.

Peace,
Robert

Yeah, I can't quite picture that myself (chair as steering wheel).....

Haha. I like word games, so I can’t help but think of a steering wheel chair. Think of the effort required for a wheel to need a mounted chair! smiling smiley

As to the laminations, I use one of two approaches. For this “wheel” (steering arch sounds weird, doesn’t it?), I simply threw together a quick jig with the same old blocks I always use. The blocks pivot on a single screw, so can rotate a bit to compensate for the curving laminations and the flat faces.
The blocks are taller than the laminations, so when the whole shebang is covered with packing tape, to mask from squeeze out, the laminations can be lightly clamped, then hammered flat with a small hammer and block of wood.

Barring a flat jig to glue on, the laminated bundle can be wrapped with strong twine in a spiral pattern. Nylon masonry twine is the best, and if a few spirals up and back are made, tightly, the bundle will stay tight.

Another approach, which works best with less severe bends, is to tape the bundle together with adhesive tape.

Anyway, the wheel will look somewhat like this, though there is plenty of extra on either end. The plan is to wrap the finished wheel with twine in a ringbolt hitch pattern and paint it black.

I am seriously undecided on how to do the spokes. I’m not sure if I want round or flat spokes. For now, the wheel blank can help enough to size the rest, and figure out the lock to lock distance, and therefore a suitable starting point for the ratio, depending on how far the steering arms,and drag link need to travel...

Wait. What? smiling smiley winking smiley

Peace,
Robert


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Carty McCartFace Robert J
Fresno, CA, USA   USA
More like this, I suppose. With another pair, at three and nine-ish, this should be fine, and actually look almost not terrible.

The idea of using the dulled hole saw as a hub occurred to me as I was casting about for a substitute for this picture.
Once I set the saw down, and really saw (no pun intended) the shape of the key hole and location of the drive pins, I thought it would make a fine hub center...

And, now I know how the wheel will attach to the steering shaft!

A lot happened, even though nothing really happened. smiling smiley

Peace,
Robert

P.S. The copper tube was just a remnant laying about. I just made it to try, but I think I’m going to keep it.


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Rhysn Rhys Nolan
Tamworth, Staffordshire, UK   GBR
Looking good. That is a clever idea. Here in the UK it's cheaper to buy a quick release.
A random tip I picked up... if you linish back the teeth on the outside of a hole saw the cut becomes a whole lot cleaner and more accurate.

Carty McCartFace Robert J
Fresno, CA, USA   USA
Rhys,
I had intended to use a bicycle hub, which I haven’t hacksawed apart, yet, so I cast about for something of similar diameter. The hole saw just seems perfect. I’ll turn it over, open end up, and install a horn and horn button. Why not? smiling smiley

I have no idea what a quick release is, but I’m assuming a steering wheel hub. I’ve no idea where to procure any cart type stuff except off the web, and I reluctantly do that.

Also, the steering shaft and gears will also be self made from found junk bits, so it fits to have a junk bit wheel, too. smiling smiley

Excellent tip about the hole saw. I only use them to cut out sheave blanks, so they always get trued up in the lathing, anyhow, but that is a valuable tip to have in the pocket. Cheers!

Peace,
Robert

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carChips Avatar
carChips Victor Harnish
Kelowna, BC, Canada   CAN
1933 MG Magnette
1973 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "Chip"
1989 GMC Sierra 1500 "Bush Truck"
The ingenuity on this forum never ceases to amaze me!



S'all for now!

Rhysn Rhys Nolan
Tamworth, Staffordshire, UK   GBR
It's my misunderstanding! I thought you were going to use the worn out hole saw as the hub, and then one of the arbors fastened into the steering column to mount it. That way you could readily de-mount the steering arc to facilitate getting in and out. (Most of us need that smiling smiley Old knees and hips sad smiley

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Carty McCartFace Robert J
Fresno, CA, USA   USA
In reply to # 33371 by Rhysn It's my misunderstanding! I thought you were going to use the worn out hole saw as the hub, and then one of the arbors fastened into the steering column to mount it. That way you could readily de-mount the steering arc to facilitate getting in and out. (Most of us need that smiling smiley Old knees and hips sad smiley

Misunderstanding? You mean more smarter than me? It had never occurred to make the thing removable! Brilliant.

But, no, I had just thought to use the squared off hole in the center as a means to key into the tube used as a steering shaft. More likely, I will simply use the piece as an inspiration, and make a hub. I am also still contemplating an integral spoke/hub combo cut from sheet metal...

As to the old knees and hips? Well, mine are getting older, but have had accelerated aging processes performed on them in the form of unsuccessful bicycle jumps and stunts. My left leg doesn’t bend well, at all, at the hip joint, and I can’t sit long with legs extended. My left leg is without substantial feeling most of the time.

Neither this car, nor the subsequent carts will see me in them for more than a few minutes. Which won’t stop me from building them...smiling smiley

Shoot, if I could still bend, I’d still be paddling kayaks, too!

Peace,
Robert

Carty McCartFace Robert J
Fresno, CA, USA   USA
In reply to # 33367 by carChips The ingenuity on this forum never ceases to amaze me!

I’m not sure you meant me, but if you did, I attribute my, um, inventiveness (ahem) to a life long fiscal deficiency.

Also, I credit my years of theatre work, in small theatres. Making rocketships out of dirt.

I would love to be able to actually make something the right way, someday. smiling smiley

You are correct about this forum, though. There are some incredibly ingenious posters here. I am humbled almost every time I log in by the amazing creations and ideas.

Well, amazing if you like awesome toys! I do! Hahaha.

Peace,
Robert

P.S. On the off chance you were referring to me, thank you for the wonderful compliment. I only hope I can contribute something if some value with my posts.

Rhysn Rhys Nolan
Tamworth, Staffordshire, UK   GBR
What a great term, fiscal deficiency. Me to a tee, and even under extreme cases I spend what I have(n't) got on hobbies. Actually I'm very fortunate. SWMBO allowed me to have a "toy fund" which has grown nicely by some wheeling and dealing.
Knees can't be dealt with any more. I am wondering if I have built the right CK in Kim, as I struggle to get in and out and it doesn't have rear wheels mounted. I'm OT, sorry.

Neto Ernest B
Berlin, OH, USA   USA
In reply to # 33383 by Rhysn What a great term, fiscal deficiency.

Maybe the politically correct term would be fiscally challenged.....

Carty McCartFace Robert J
Fresno, CA, USA   USA
In reply to # 33383 by Rhysn What a great term, fiscal deficiency. Me to a tee, and even under extreme cases I spend what I have(n't) got on hobbies. Actually I'm very fortunate. SWMBO allowed me to have a "toy fund" which has grown nicely by some wheeling and dealing.
Knees can't be dealt with any more. I am wondering if I have built the right CK in Kim, as I struggle to get in and out and it doesn't have rear wheels mounted. I'm OT, sorry.

I can’t imagine how the topic of fitting into a cyclekart, or other kart type, would ever be OT. My only drive for posting is to share these trials with others.

The bonus that comes along with serial postings is the familiarity that forms between posters. These friendships are as valuable a part of this whole exercise as are blueprints and/or parts sources.

To me. smiling smiley

For example, you could expand on why you think Kim will be difficult to enter/exit, and we could all discuss it, mayhaps discovering a method that will work for many folks. Or, perhaps we can prevent a body from making an ill fitting kart to begin with by discussing it.

I don’t know. I guess I just mean that pumpkin pie recipes could even be ON Topic, provided there is some context to connect them to the larger conversation, which is always about designing, figuring, and building, right?

Isn’t the bottom line the building of the things? It is to me. smiling smiley


Peace,
Robert

Rhysn Rhys Nolan
Tamworth, Staffordshire, UK   GBR
I'm suspecting that not too many folks here have failed replacement knees (well I hope not if mine's anything to go by). February 2011 most of my right knee was replaced with titanium, pain is now (24/7) a whole lot worse than it was, mechanically OK, but very painful. Left knee they won't operate on, so it doesn't bend well... neither does the hip. Too many years of hockey, small boat sailing etc has done the damage.Not to mention I'm old and worn out.
So how foes any car make it better or worse? Low level of seating is bad for me, but lower C of G...
I have to consider what I put as a structure that I can put hands on to lower myself in or push myself out. Seat back HAS to be strong.
If I were to build a car to the Gittreville "Edwardian" guidelines that would help. It's likely/possible that I will pull the mechanicals out of Kim to do that, new chassis and body will be easy now that CMD Bentaxle has shared some info (Thanks Dave).
minor limitation there is not buying more front end bits. Kim was partly chosen as I had springs, not many Edwardians used 1/4 elliptics, nor semi which I have "in stock".

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