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smallboregarage Chuck Kraeuter
Portland, OR, USA   USA
Tonight, I thought that I would start this build thread on my cyclekart project, in hopes that the dialogue can better help me finish as well as help others enjoy their own builds. I can certainly use the practice at describing what I do and why, but first a few words of caution:

I have worked in the field of conceptual product design for my entire career and still do, and while I am not particularly good at that, I am very comfortable with failure and dead ends. I've experienced success from making the illogical choice and often therefore gravitate in that direction. We all know that we learn from our mistakes, and I can tell you that I'm good for about one a day.

Let's start with the attached CAD drawings. This is the current vision of what I am building. In my head it originally looked like a simple concept. As late as the 90s, I would have designed this kart using foamcore board and hot melt glue. I would have stood at a large table and "sketched" with a number 11 x-acto blade and a steel ruler. Failures and dead ends would have piled up. I would have needed a lot of space. Today I'm given a small cubicle and SolidWorks.

Files of parts pile up on my computer's desktop. Related parts are drawn in the same file as separate bodies. Sheet metal parts are defined in a way that I can flatten them temporarily in order to make patterns. Subassemblies are loaded into the assembly seen below. It's all very intoxacating.

Chuck

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Woodysrods Silver Member Brian Woods
Westbank B.C., Canada   CAN
I for one am very intrigued!
I have been watching your Journal entries each week and have been waiting patiently for the above "coming out" so to speak??
Please keep posting pictures.
I like the concept of how you are accomplishing this build.
Good Road
Brian

Tom Knight Avatar
Las Vegas, NV, USA   USA
1911 CycleKart Racing "Yellow Peril"
Great drawings, is that a 1919 Grafton racer? It's still racing over in UK....I have one in progress as well...T

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Tom Knight Avatar
Las Vegas, NV, USA   USA
1911 CycleKart Racing "Yellow Peril"
What I've got sooooo far....T



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-03-27 11:25 AM by Tom Knight.


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smallboregarage Avatar
smallboregarage Chuck Kraeuter
Portland, OR, USA   USA
Tom, Thanks for posting a pic of your Grafton. It looks like we are heading down the same road, so to speak. Hat's off to you for attempting rear suspension; looking forward to seeing what you work out. I'm going to post a few more CAD drawings tonight of the chassis rails and and a couple of shots of my assembly so far.

The rails are made from ash. The front springs and mid chassis jack shaft are clamped in place; I thought that I would avoid putting holes in either the springs or the rails.

Chuck


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Woodysrods Silver Member Brian Woods
Westbank B.C., Canada   CAN
Wish I could have done that with my build plans.
I had to do it the old fashion way with pencil and paper???
Thought I was a real hero when I had my scale drawing blown up and printed to actual size at the local post net.
Love for my next CK to have that kind of precision drawings,
Great Work Chuck!thumbs up
PS
Tom yours is looking wonderful as well.
There are going to be so many new CKs out this year!hot smiley

smallboregarage Avatar
smallboregarage Chuck Kraeuter
Portland, OR, USA   USA
Thanks Brian. I have heard some good things about a cloud based CAD/CAM program called Fusion360; it was free to use for hobbyists. I have no experience with it but, it would be the first place I'd go if I ever got a computer at home. (I follow this forum on an iPad).

I've got more drawings to post tonight. The kart's body and driver's shell will fasten inside the rails and, my guess, will do all of the work; resisting twisting. I think I need to pay close attention to how they connect. Or, also shown, is a frame tucked inside the body, maybe squeezing in on the driver. Perhaps this needs to solved with a mockup.

Chuck

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smallboregarage Avatar
smallboregarage Chuck Kraeuter
Portland, OR, USA   USA
Shaped some steel for the fuel tank. Originally thought that I would make this in copper, but I found the steel lying around.


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smallboregarage Avatar
smallboregarage Chuck Kraeuter
Portland, OR, USA   USA
Read the news today about Tieton, oh boy. So, I put together a task list and filled in my calendar. As it turns out, I would need to schedule about twice the tasks each week that I have been planning in order to make the date. And since I usually underestimate the time that it takes me to do things by about half, I would need to work four times as hard. I turned up the heat.

I've been needing to make the TAV mounting plates for some time now, so today I sourced the stock: one inch aluminum fixture plate from the recycling pile in the garage. I don't have a saw big enough to cut these pieces up so I separate it using a drill bit in the mill. Each cut took me about 15 minutes, but it saves me a bundle.

I also cut a key way in my steering tube and fit the drum to the end. I better start getting some of this stuff put together if I'll any chance of making the date.

If there is anyone in the Portland area that wants to get together and share plans about Tieton, let me know.

Chuck

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Denny Graham Gold Member Dennis Graham
Sandwich, IL, USA   USA
1950 Chevrolet 3600 "Old Blue"
1954 Chevrolet 3600
Ah ha!!!!! now I'm beginning to see what it is you're after Chuck. Great drawings, wish I had
the time left to learn to use a 3d program like that.
To a very minor degree, I take the same approach as you do when making parts. I've had
DesignCad on one of my computers since probably some time in the 80's. My neighbor was
a software engineer for ComEd and used to bring me a new copy of DesignCad every couple
of months. Thing were evolving at a rapid pace back then and there were constant updates.
I'm presently using V23 but I still only use it in the 2d mode. It's to involved for an old dude like
me to get into 3d renderings. Never could master the AutoCad we had at work when I was running
and programming CMM's.
But.....dang near every part I've had to make for the machines I've restored or built get drawn
up before I cut anything. Saves a lot of mistakes, most of the time that is. Sooner or later I have
to actually start cutting and fitting things which don't show up in a drawing. I find it a real boon
when a part goes into the lathe or mill, such as the motor mount I just finished for the Riley.
Keep those photo's coming Chuck, the purpose of those random parts is a lot more clear
and I find your approach very interesting.
Denny Graham
Sandwich, IL

smallboregarage Avatar
smallboregarage Chuck Kraeuter
Portland, OR, USA   USA
I focused this week on getting the fuel tank set in place. The front brace is fabricated from 4130 tube and sheet. I put a strip of rubber window seal between the tank and hoop. The whole assembly (including the fasteners) weigh a little less than the fuel tank that I removed from the Predator engine.


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Denny Graham Gold Member Dennis Graham
Sandwich, IL, USA   USA
1950 Chevrolet 3600 "Old Blue"
1954 Chevrolet 3600
Chuck, Did you make your own springs? I noticed the 5160 written on the springs.
I see a partial number---1/4 so I assume they are 1.25" material but how thick?
Also, noticed RCxxxx something blanked out on one. Did you send them out for
heat treat and what was the Rockwell C that you had them drawn back to?
I'm asking cuz I've made up a few sets of 1.25" x.188" 5160 springs from annealed
stock and have yet to do the heat treat.
Thanks
Denny Graham
Sandwich, IL

smallboregarage Avatar
smallboregarage Chuck Kraeuter
Portland, OR, USA   USA
Denny, they are 1 1/4 x 1/4. I bought 36 inches from McMaster and cut it in half. I'm hoping that they are currently too long. When the kart is close to finished and I can sit in it, I can slide the springs back and forth in their clamps and adjust the sag. I guess I'd look for about an inch. 5160, came hardened to RC25. If they look promising, I'll just send them out for heat treat to about 48RC before driving the kart. I don't know if that's right; I read it somewhere.

Denny Graham Gold Member Dennis Graham
Sandwich, IL, USA   USA
1950 Chevrolet 3600 "Old Blue"
1954 Chevrolet 3600
Thanks. 48 RC sounds about right. I've found the knife forums have about the
best information on heat treating spring steel if you can sort out all that is BS.
I've also found that the heat treaters guard their processes to closely to get
anything out of them. You could shoot a little higher and if you needed to
draw them back a little bit more you could temper them more in the oven
on the cleaning cycle, as long as it gets to at least 400°F.
Between 400°F and 600°F is your tempering range for 5160 from
what I've read.
1/4" might be a little stiff in that short of a spring, then again, maybe not.
Please let me know how that works out when you get it all together. It may
help me when I get to fitting mine up.
Good luck.
dg

gearguy Charles Schultz
Oil City, PA, USA   USA
I have posted before of the late Carroll Smith's excellent book "Engineer to Win." Most of our metals and heat treating questions are covered in a very readable and understandable manner. Denny is correct that there is far too much BS floating about the internet. Do not risk your safety, the safety of others, and your budget relying on something somebody from somewhere posted. If people do not refer to proper sources or have the technical background germane to the topic do everyone a favor and do more research. We went through this leaf spring discussion a year ago; use the search function. I posted a chart with rates and dimensions plus the formulas. Plenty of inexpensive leaf springs available.

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